Loveland City Government

Straight From The Heart – September 1, 2020

City Hall 120 W Loveland, Loveland OH 45140  •  lovelandoh.gov  •  513-683-0150   

Tom Smith, Assistant City ManagerThe preliminary on-line survey for the comprehensive plan that was on the City’s website is now closed. Watch for upcoming surveys and open houses so you can weigh in on Loveland’s Comprehensive Plan. At their last meeting, the Comprehensive Master Development Plan Committee established sub-groups that will focus on Quality of Life and Connectivity/Mobility aspects of the community:
Character and Identity – Will address how new buildings should look, how the City can improve its gateways and corridors, streetscaping and landscaping strategies;
Economic Development – Will address strategies to attract and retain new businesses, how to improve our existing business districts and corridors, what amenities do our current businesses require to remain successful including electronic and utility infrastructure;
Residential – Will address strategies to improve or keep existing residential neighborhoods healthy, guidance for what additional housing types are needed in the community, visions for future annexation areas; and
Parks and Natural Resources – Will address how the City can better utilize its existing parks and natural resources, how to improve access to these facilities, recommendations for additional parks or related facilities needed within the community.

David Kennedy, City ManagerThe City is preparing to commence the long-awaited Broadway Street Stabilization Project.  The $413,000 project will address the long-standing issue of hillside slippage along approximately 400 linear feet of Broadway Street near the intersection of Hanna Avenue. To stabilize the hillside, a concrete pier wall will be installed.  Additionally, an existing 36” box culvert will be replaced, and five new catch basins also installed.  Following the installation of the pier wall, box culvert and catch basins, new guard rails and concrete curbing will be installed.Road Slippage – Broadway StreetThe financial parameters for the project include 50% of the project costs through an Ohio Public Works Commission (OPWC) grant and 50% through a 0%, OPWC loan.  The City had submitted for funding for this project numerous times in the past, so for it to finally be funded was excellent news as the problem was worsening.The City’s infrastructure needs are significant and include roads, parks, stormwater, curbs/gutters, and our water treatment facility and distribution system. Maintaining and upgrading our infrastructure is an expensive endeavor which is why the City aggressively seeks state and federal grant funding to help offset the cost to complete important projects.  This effort is led by City Engineer, Cindy Klopfenstein who along with Public Works Director, Scott Wisby must monitor and prioritize the needs of the City’s infrastructure. Cindy has been able to secure numerous grants for the City through the OPWC program and other state funding sources.Although the project was delayed as the City awaited formal release of state funding due to the COVID-19 pandemic, construction will begin as soon as possible.  The design of the project is a long-term solution that will not only address an important public infrastructure project, it will also protect adjacent private property. Once the project commences, motorists should anticipate some road closures and corresponding detours, which will be reported in advance. For any questions on this project or future infrastructure projects, please call City Manager, David Kennedy, at 513-707-1454 or by email at [email protected]

Dennis Sean Rahe, Police ChiefSometimes people ask us, “What does law enforcement “Professional Standards” mean?” Many professions across the world hold themselves to a high standard of conduct. And, to prove compliance, they have regular peer-reviewed audits to ensure they are meeting the highest standards their industry requires.  The Loveland Police Department recognizes the immense responsibility and authority we are granted. We remain committed to living the highest professional standards. In fact, our very first core value is Integrity. The Ohio Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board is an important part of our integrity. They serve as law enforcement peer reviewer auditors in Ohio. Agencies, like the Loveland Police Department, wishing to certify must follow strict policies and procedures but also prove compliance to those policies in our actions and training to the assessment team. The LPD Family is proud to be certified by the Ohio Collaborative and to expect the highest professional standards from each other. To learn more about the Ohio Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board please visit their website. 

Bruce Hawk, LSFD Executive OfficerWithout the federal Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program, our community would have to pay much more for emergency services.  Fortunately, the Loveland-Symmes Fire Department was successful this year in receiving three grants totaling nearly 40 thousand dollars. These funds were received from the Federal Government and the State of Ohio.  This year’s funding will be utilized to send three firefighters to the University of Cincinnati, where they will be trained as paramedics.  This is a year long process that costs over 10 thousand dollars per student.  The remaining grant funding will be used for COVID-19 protective equipment.  In addition, a fourth firefighter will be sent to Sinclair College paid for by the Candice Cook Foundation.  The Department has applied for additional grants that are in process and the department hopes to hear from the government sometime this fall.

Tom Smith, Assistant City ManagerIn their meeting held on July 28, 2020, the City Council motioned to send the application for a rezone back to the Planning and Zoning Commission for clarification on the City of Loveland Code of Ordinances Chapter 1115.06: Standards for Zoning Map Amendments. The proposed re-zone is for property located at approx. North Second Street (St. Rt. 48) south of the Sentry Hill Subdivision. The proposed re-zone would go from Residential- Medium Density (R-MD) to Residential- Multi Family (R-MF).The Planning and Zoning Commission met this month to review a proposed zoning text amendment.  The amendment, if approved by council, would add a definition for retail warehousing to the Planning and Zoning Code, and add it as a permitted use in the Light Industrial (L-I) zoning district. At the meeting, the Planning and Zoning Commission also began discussion on the process for conducting an in-house review and amendments of the City’s Planning and Zoning Code. While this work by the commission will be a lengthy one, it will save the City considerable money over hiring a consultant to conduct the task.The Building and Zoning department is in the development of converting its applications, permits, payment methods, and processes to digital formats. With this conversion nearly all functions of the department will be digital and online.The City would like to welcome Paramount Residential Mortgage Group (PRMG) to the Downtown District. PRMG will be opening a Loveland office in the former Cincy Shirts location at 295 West Loveland Avenue. PRMG has nearly 180 branches throughout the country and will be a nice addition to the City’s downtown business district.The Loveland Life Pantry received a permit for interior alterations. They will be moving into the Shoppers Haven Shopping Center.  Section D of the development taking place at the NorthStar Church received its temporary occupancy permit; just in time for school to start. The Tiger Express Laundromat also received their permit for interior alterations.  

Tom Smith, Assistant City ManagerPlease remember that protecting the aesthetics, integrity, vitality, and property values of residential neighborhoods and commercial zones are integral to health, safety, and wellness; and provides a sense of propriety that assists in the growth of personal and community investment.  As summer is upon us, here are a couple of tips that will enhance the appearance and value of your home.
Remove and replace loose peeling paint;
Trim back trees or foliage to provide for additional sunlight to exterior mold areas;
Cleaning and removing leaves, branches, and debris regularly from gutters can prevent damage to fascia, soffit, roofing, and in some cases leakage into your home;
Proper storage of vehicles that are inoperable and/or unlicensed; 
Proper storage of lawn equipment, trash, garbage, and refuse; and
Removal of any mold or mildew that may be surfacing on exterior walls 

To report an issue or problem please visit: https://www.lovelandoh.gov/RequestTracker.aspx.

For a list of upcoming meetings, click here. [Read More ➡️]

Loveland City Government

Straight From The Heart – July 17, 2020

City Hall 120 W Loveland, Loveland OH 45140  •  lovelandoh.gov  •  513-683-0150   

Chief Otto J Huber The winds of March blew much more into our fire stations than the usual leaves that come with the onset of spring. This year the pandemic caused us to look at new ways of doing business serving our customers and our firefighters. The Fire Department and our firefighters are used to unexpected challenges. Those come with the job, which is why we have evolved over the years to an all hazards agency.  During my time with the department we have evolved from just responding to occasional fires, water rescues, and transportation accidents, to now adding emergency medical calls, hazardous materials events, and preparing for biological, domestic, and foreign terrorism just to mention a few. I challenged Assistant Chief Tom Turner and Deputy Chief Mike Books to prepare the department by developing an operations plan that would not only ensure we could continue to provide all the services that our customers and communities have come to expect and depend on, but also how we would operate in an environment that could mean a loss of up to two thirds of our resources, supplies, and work force. Potentially this thing called COVID could strip the department of our highly trained work force through no fault of our own, other than an infection rate that was predicted to cripple many communities.  This plan needed to be resilient and well thought out. These men were up to the challenge. After all, most of our emergency and event planning has been scribed by these two professionals over the past 25 years. So while everyone was locked down, social distancing, and searching for toilet paper, your fire department was preparing for the worst case scenario along with how to continue to honor our mission statement of providing the most technological advanced fire and EMS service to our residents with the highest trained professionals; and to deliver that service to our customers with loyalty and compassion. While we find this event far from over, your fire department continues to remain committed to being here for you today, tomorrow, and next month. That is possible because of a great and dedicated work force that puts our customers first. Rest assured we will remain diligent in our pursuit of your family’s safety and the safety and welfare of all Loveland-Symmes residents.

Sponsored by the Loveland Tree and Environment Committee

The City’s Comprehensive Master Plan is in the beginning phases of development. Similar to the Downtown Master Plan that was completed in 2019, which focused on the future growth of the downtown area, the Comprehensive Master Plan encompasses the future planning of the City as a whole. A Comprehensive Master Plan Committee has been established to provide guidance on key issues such as business development, traffic, parking, neighborhood preservation, and many others involving the future of the City of Loveland.  As the planning process kicks off, your participation in a brief eleven question Googledocs survey will significantly aid in the development of the City’s Comprehensive Master Plan. The survey can be found at: https://forms.gle/pMVMnRZjDfshofHa9. This survey is one of many future attempts, including additional surveys, public meetings, focus groups, and open houses to foster greater public involvement in the creation of this very important plan that can shape the future of the City of Loveland.

Each year MADD recognizes officers who go above and beyond to curb impaired driving in their communities. The Top Cop Award is presented to an officer who continually displays a commitment to reducing impaired driving through enforcement, education, and prevention. 
On Tuesday, a representative from the MADD Columbus office drove to Loveland to present the 2020 Top Cop Award to Officer Jake Salamon.  The award recognizes his dedication to the safety of the Loveland community through concentrated traffic enforcement centered on removing impaired drivers from the roadway.  Chief Rahe said, “We are happy Jake earned recognition for his dedication to the Loveland community.  Jake’s passion has always been service and we are thankful he chose Loveland.”

The Shoppes of Loveland welcomed Dollar Tree to their business park last month. In their meeting held on June 24, the Planning and Zoning Commission approved plans for exterior elevations to what is currently DJ’s Food Mart, but will be converted into Tiger Express Coin Laundry laundromat; and a conditional use permit for the property located at 210 Harrison Ave.  The permit is for the use of a short-term rental. In addition, the Planning and Zoning Commission held a public hearing and reviewed and application for a re-zone for property off North Second Street (St. Rt. 48) south of the Sentry Hill Subdivision. The proposed re-zone would go from Residential- Medium Density (R-MD) to Residential- Multi Family (R-MF). The Planning and Zoning Commission tabled their recommendation for a future meeting to be held on July 21. 

The bridge over the O’Bannon Creek, just north of Nisbet Park is in need of repairs.  The condition of the bridge was downgraded during the Ohio Department of Transportation’s (ODOT) last inspection.  The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) has hired a consultant to conduct a feasibility and design study.  Part of this study will require some borings and other geotech work, which will take about three days to complete. ODNR anticipates the closure will occur the week of July 27.

In these times of all the conflicting messages – stay at home, mask recommended, stay six feet apart, mask REQUIRED, please consider paying your Utility bill via ACH.  Using the ACH option authorizes the City to take the amount due on your utility account from your checking account on the 15th of the month.  You will still receive a bill showing the amount that will be taken out.  To get it set up, just complete the form on the City’s website and send it along with a voided check to us.  You can drop it off in person, leave it in the drop box next to the drive thru window, or mail it to us as 120 W Loveland Avenue.  If you are one of many who don’t use checks anymore, many banks have an online option to print a sample check or documentation of your routing and account number.  Bank branches can also print something to give to us.  

Please remember that protecting the aesthetics, integrity, vitality, and property values of residential neighborhoods and commercial zones are integral to health, safety, and wellness; and provides a sense of propriety that assists in the growth of personal and community investment.  As summer is upon us, here are a couple of tips that will enhance the appearance and value of your home.
Remove and replace loose peeling paint;
Trim back trees or foliage to provide for additional sunlight to exterior mold areas;
Cleaning and removing leaves, branches, and debris regularly from gutters can prevent damage to fascia, soffit, roofing, and in some cases leakage into your home;
Proper storage of vehicles that are inoperable and/or unlicensed; 
Proper storage of lawn equipment, trash, garbage, and refuse; and
Removal of any mold or mildew that may be surfacing on exterior walls 

To report an issue or problem click here.

For a list of upcoming meetings, click here. [Read More ➡️]